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During the Museum’s closure for a restoration, renovation and expansion project, MONA is offering online curated exhibitions. Guests are invited to visit the MONA website mona.unk.edu to enter a simulated gallery displaying artworks from the Museum’s permanent collection. Viewers can learn more about the art and artists in the text that accompanies the artwork.

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The Gothenburg Times would like to congratulate the following local area students for their graduations from college.

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Rain finally came to Gothenburg on April 29, the day of the Chamber of Commerce’s annual Spring Fling event. The Chamber remained optimistic in their communication with the public and Spring Fling vendors, stating that rain was sorely needed.

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Nichole Hetz and Colten Venteicher of Gothenburg Early Childhood Learning Coalition accepted a grant check from Black Hills Energy for $15,000.00. The grant was awarded to GECLC on Wednesday, April 27, 2022 at the GECLC offices in the Chamber of Commerce building. The grant will go towards funding the Impact Center Project. Picture here are Landon Johnson, Eppie Sisneros, Nichole Hetz, Colten Venteicher, Brett Rooks, and Justin Gould. (Photo by, Ashley Mohler)

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If you were to see a help wanted ad for someone who is “Caring, Compassionate, Kind, Reliable, Tireless, Knowledgeable, and Professional,” what job might you think you are applying for? Maybe the job description would include phrases like, “must understand brain development science, nutrition, child psychology, and have experience in physical education and music.” And that’s not to mention oftentimes being comfortable running a small business!

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If you’ve been out and about town lately you’ve probably seen herds of children wandering from business to business or touring specific sites. Dudley Elementary School has been taking their students to become acquainted with local businesses.

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Extremely dry conditions have made planting difficult for several producers across the region. Previous articles covered planting considerations including seeding depth, populations, soil temperature, and moisture in respect to crop germination and herbicide activation. This past week, UNL shared some excellent information about planting into dry conditions on their CropWatch website, and I wanted to reiterate a few key points. Seeing as how it’s been very dry across our region; some producers might consider planting their corn or soybean crop deeper than the standard recommendation of 1.5-2” to reach uniform moisture. Research at Purdue University and UNL finds that growers could plant their corn crop a little deeper (2.5-3” even) without too many ill effects, but caution against planting soybeans deeper than 2.5” to find uniform moisture. Planting the crop too deep may negatively impact timely emergence. Over the past couple weeks, pivots have been running across the county. This might be beneficial in situations where moisture is needed to properly work the soil (i.e., soils are too hard, powdery, or cloddy) and get the planter in the ground but be cautious about temperature swings. The last thing you want is to have water freeze in the pivot overnight, so be mindful about ice buildup. On very hard soils, runoff could be an issue so keep application rates low to avoid too much runoff. Finally, in very dry soils, herbicide injury can be a problem, especially with soybeans. If you plan to use PPO herbicides on soybean fields, be sure the seed vee is properly closed, no soil cracking is apparent along the seed trench, and enough moisture is available for the crop to take up water and stimulate germination. Apply your PPO herbicides a few days after planting and activate with water if necessary for proper weed control. We want to avoid seedling injury if at all possible. More information about planting into dry conditions can be found on UNL’s CropWatch website.

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Recent fires have been devastating for some feedlots and cattle producers as hay bales are quite combustible with extremely dry, hot, and windy conditions. If your operation has been impacted, there are resources available. The Nebraska Department of Ag (NDA) has a Hay & Forage Hotline for potential buyers and sellers of hay and forage products. Producers who wish to sell their hay can contact the hotline at 402-471-4876. Their information is added to a “Sellers List” that is available online in a PDF format. Those interested in purchasing hay can access the list at the NDA’s website (https://nda.nebraska.gov/promotion/hay/index.html), contact the sellers individually, and negotiate individual transactions. Questions about the Hay & Forage Hotline program can be directed to the Department of Ag (402-471-4876).

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The following passages come from copies of previous publications of the Gothenburg Times, they have been summarized by Ashley Mohler. Each passage has its source and is cited at the end of the passages.

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Elections are this month and with so many candidates running the Gothenburg Times has contacted them to offer candidates an opportunity to introduce themselves to you. Gathered here are the response we received back, in each of the following candidate’s own words. Candidates were asked to tell our readers their name, where they call home, why they decided to run, what position they were running for, and matters they are

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